School of Sports Sciences professor to participate in service project in Nepal for two weeks

Brendan Shriver, News Writer

Dr. Brandy Clemmer, a School of Sports Sciences professor and the head of the school’s Leadership Academy, will be leaving the United States next week to participate in a service project in Nepal with the organization Wine to Water for two weeks.

This project is nothing new to Dr. Clemmer. As head of the Leadership Academy, she and a selected group of Sport Management majors have engaged in service projects at places like Victory Junction, School of Life in Gary, WV and many other local community service projects.

On a Saturday morning In April 2015, an earthquake devastated the country of Nepal. Wine to Water was able to respond quickly to this natural disaster by having a team on the ground within a few days to help provide clean water to tens of thousands of people. With all that has been accomplished, the work is far from over.

“In Nepal, I will have the rare opportunity to learn about redevelopment, experience water projects first-hand, such as digging wells, constructing rainwater harvesting systems, making bio-sand filters, and performing monitoring and evaluation procedures on some of these projects,” Dr. Clemmer says.

Dr. Clemmer was introduced to the organization when the book Wine to Water was a campus-wide read in 2013. By reading the book, she developed an immense interest in the organization and was also able to hear the author of the book and the founder of the organization, Doc Hendley, speak on campus.

Dr. Clemmer decided to volunteer with the organization in helping out with the Global Water Crisis. The organization gives volunteers the choice to serve in the Amazon region (Peru, Colombia or Brazil), the Dominican Republic or Nepal.

Dr. Clemmer said that her original proposal was to travel to the Amazon region but due to the lack of projects in the area, the organization had to cancel the trip. She then said that she was then given the option to provide the same service in Nepal. With that, she applied and received a Wings Grant from Wingate in the spring of 2018 to go on the trip.

“I am looking forward to immersing myself in a different culture and observe the different leadership styles present in a crisis situation,” Dr. Clemmer says.

Leadership Academy students will not join her on the trip. Dr. Clemmer leaves on the 26th and won’t return until Oct. 12.

Edited by Brendan Shriver    

Students Respond to Change in ‘Animal Crackers’ Packaging

Matthew Myers, Staff Writer

After 116 years, animals on the animal cracker box are roaming free. Nabisco changed the packing for their product after a successful lobbying attempt from People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA).

Nabisco claims the changes were made so that the packaging has a fresh look.

A question being asked by many is whether or not this marketing strategy will be effective. At Wingate University, 20 students were asked their opinion on this topic, and if it would persuade them to buy less or more animal crackers.

16 out of the 20 students did not care about the branding switch. But while most people didn’t care, the opinions of the ones that did were fiery.

According to Carly Heins, a junior, “I am so happy the animals are free! Who doesn’t love seeing animals freed from their cages? The changes made by Nabisco make me more inclined to buy animals crackers”.

On the flip side, Jake Dudzik, a sophomore, “I condemn the changes made by Nabisco. Nabisco changed a 116-year-old iconic label because an animal activist company begged them to. To see a mega-corporation fold to the request of an activist group is absolutely pathetic”.

Dudzik goes on explain “This change boils down to political correctness. That is something the majority of Americans are fed up with. I do not foresee this strategy garnering Nabisco any substantial revenue”.

At least on  Wingate’s campus, the repackaging does not seem like it will have a large effect on sales. Almost everyone stated that they would continue to buy animal crackers at the same rate they buy them now. While there is speculation about positive long-term effects, only time will tell if this change will pay off.   

Edited By, Rachael Robinson

Campus Dining Welcomes Changes for 2018

Aaliyah Parson, Staff Writer

W.T Harris Dining Hall welcomes new and returning students after making several new improvements over the summer. The caf has made renovations that not only improve the quality of service to students but the dining experience as well. Accommodations were also made during the renovations for the large influx of new students.

One of the many noticeable changes is the relocation of the pizza station. A new salad prep and fresh fruit station were also added as well as a new Yogurt and Dessert station and two new beverage stations.

David Penny, general manager of Aramark, stated his goal when making improvements was, “To overall improve dining. The goal is long reaching. I have a five-year plan of continuously improving.”

While making these improvements Penny’s biggest challenge was time, “Never enough time where students aren’t on campus. Everything has to be done in short time periods.”

Many students occupied campus over the summer during summer camp and training. While returning students have watched these changes unfold, what Penny has in store next is sure to be a surprise.

Penny exclaims, “The amount of improvements we have planned over the next five years will not be recognizable to anyone right now!”

Edited by Rachael Robinson

Pushing New Boundaries at Wingate University

Savanna Harris, Staff Writer

The start of your college journey can come across as daunting. In most cases, everything is new. New city, new people, the list goes on.

From moving into a space filled with unfamiliar faces to hoping that you don’t walk into the wrong room on your first day of classes, it can all seem rather intimidating.

No one knows this to be true more than the 933 new members of the freshman class of 2022 here at Wingate. With orientation long over and classes beginning more than two weeks ago now, they have gotten a firsthand look at college life.

Freshmen Kayden Wilson and Hailey McCarty were both eager to share their thoughts.

Overall, the general consensus seemed to be that, so far, college is great but definitely a far cry from high school.

According to Hailey, “It’s very… different from the life that I am used to. I’ve never had this amount of freedom before. There’s definitely been a learning curve as I’ve figured things out.”

On the other hand, Kayden went as far as to say, “Honestly, college, in my opinion, is amazing. Personally, I thought I would end up being homesick, but I took Ruth’s (one of the Orientation leaders) advice when she said to get involved and have loved every second on this campus!”

Getting involved in your new community can be one of the best ways to become more connected to it. Along with potentially opening up new opportunities, it allows for the chance to connect with people on an individual level.

“I am a part of the Common Ground worship ministry here on campus, as a singer,” Hailey said. “It’s been really cool meeting other people who are into the same things that I am through that program. I’m also thinking about joining the Psychology Club, but I haven’t fully decided yet.”

Another way to meet new people, although this one isn’t quite so voluntary, is living in a dorm for the first time. Hailey and Kayden are thankfully enjoying their new living situations.

Kayden said, “I love my roomies and my suitemates across the hall! We have an open door policy and it makes me feel a lot closer with them.” It remains true that living in that close of quarters with people can cause friendships to form extremely quickly.

All in all, let’s face it, being a freshman can be scary. But, despite occasional homesickness or a particularly stressful class or assignment, college is the adventure of a lifetime. It may not seem like it at times, but running through a downpour to make your 8 a.m. will be worth it in the end. There might even be time for the occasional Netflix binge, too.

Edited by Rachael Robinson

Wingate moves to 2-0 with win over Fayetteville State

Brendan Shriver, Staff Writer

Wingate jumped out to a 27-6 lead en route to a wire-to-wire 27-13 victory over Fayetteville State Saturday night at Irwin Belk Stadium. This is the fifth straight year the Bulldogs started a season 2-0.

“It was a good win. Fayetteville State was a much bigger, more physical team than what we faced last week. It was a step up in physicality, which will help us heading to next week’s game,” Wingate Head Football Coach Joe Reich says.

In his second career start, redshirt freshman quarterback Shaw Crocker connected on 19-of-33 passes for 228 yards and three touchdowns, with his primary receiver being BJ Muckelvene, who caught seven passes for 122 yards and a TD. Crocker now has 5 touchdown passes through two games this season. “Shaw continues to take steps forward, both in practices and during games, which is good to see,” Reich says.

Joe Kelly led the Wingate defense with 13 tackles on the night. Cardell Rawlings also contributed with two sacks and Juan Pagan-Gonzalez had three tackles and an interception.

But perhaps the biggest factor in Wingate’s victory was the special teams. “Our punter was a difference maker,” Reich says. “He got us out of jams. The kicker did a nice job as well. It was also good to see Ronnie Procopio break off a big return.”

Chris Birozes averaged 44 yards on six punts, with a long of 55 and another punt downed at the two-yard line. McLean Robertson was two-for-two on field goals, connecting on a 31-yarder and 42-yarder while also going three-for-three in PATs. Procopio had a 48-yard kickoff return to start the third quarter.

Wingate is back in action next Saturday, hitting the road for the first time this season and opening league play, traveling to Carson-Newman for a 7 p.m. start.

Edited by Brendan Shriver

Volleyball begins 2018 on six-match winning streak

Jalen White, Staff Writer

Last week, the Wingate Volleyball team faced Winston-Salem State, Belmont Abbey and Converse College, to open up the season. In the Belmont Abbey game, Wingate started off slow, but fought their way through the second set. They ended the game with a score of 3-1. 

Sophomore outside hitter Anne Abernathy stated, “This was a game to grow on, with the rough start and being able to fight back. It shows us our mentality for the rest of the season.”

In the next two games they dominated against Winston-Salem State and Converse, extending their hot start to the season.

The Bulldogs then faced the Augusta Jaguars in an exciting match. “At the end of the game we noticed that we needed this adversity to be a stronger contender in the SAC,” said Sophie Schaff. Wingate ended up coming on top with a 3-1 victory. They have an undefeated record of 6-0.

Senior middle blocker Phoebe Havenaar expressed that, “Winning the regular conference season and SAC, then hosting regionals, and making the Elite Eight,” are some of their teams goals this season. The team is really excited about having newcomers Molly Lambillotte, Shannon Kasprak, Reese Blackley and Kasey Eastland.

The Bulldogs are looking forward to improving their last season record of  27-4. As they go into this season as the favorites to win the SAC conference, the Bulldogs are on a roll and are ready to make a big impact.

 

Edited by Brendan Shriver

Men’s soccer looks forward to challenging season in 2018

Jaelyn Campanella, Staff Writer

As we kick off a new school year, we also welcome back fall sports, including Men’s Soccer. Coming off of a hot streak that ended with the Bulldogs being crowned national champions in 2017, they have a reputation of the top team to uphold. Not only did the Bulldogs claim the national championship last year, but for the past four years, they have won the South Atlantic Conference title.

Coach Gary Hamill said, “The upcoming season is always a challenge since we have been the top team in the league for the last several years.”

Hamill has been the head coach for 27 seasons and has been named the SAC Coach of the Year eight times, and Regional Coach of the Year twice. He is hopeful for the team this year and is excited for the opportunity to rebuild the team, since they graduated 10 seniors last year and only two of the starters are returning players.

One player to look out for is senior Pablo Jara. As the goalkeeper, he plays a vital role in the Bulldogs’ success, and has 29 career shutouts, which ranks second in SAC history. Jara was Wingate’s first player to be named a three-time All American in the school’s history and also earned All-SAC and All-Region honors for three consecutive years.

This season is unlike the past few years for the team, because it is a year of uncertainty. With so much of the past team gone it will be interesting to see the new players start. Luckily, there were no changes to the coaching staff, so the team still has a solid foundation.

Hamill also said, “ We graduated 10 seniors last May and with just two returning starters. It’s a whole new team. It is both a challenge and an exciting time to rebuild the team again and start a new era.”

The Bulldogs started their season with a pair of games in Winter Park, FL on Thursday, Aug. 30 and Saturday, Sept. 1. The first match  against Rollins ended up as a loss for the Bulldogs, with a score of 1-2. However, the game on Saturday against St. Leo was quite impressive, with strong offensive plays in the first half that led the Bulldogs to take their first victory of the season, with a final score of 3-2.

Wingate then returned home for two games. The first game of the year at Pride Park was played on Wednesday, Sept. 5 and the Bulldogs tied Chowan, 0-0. The second game was on Saturday, September 8th and Wingate defeated Flagler 4-1, as junior forward Elliot Curtis led the way with a goal and an assist.

Wingate is back in action Wednesday, Sept. 12 opening up SAC play against Mars Hill at 7:30 pm at Pride Park.

Edited by Brendan Shriver