Tag Archives: Wingate University

Football to host seven home games this fall

Crystal Fuller, Staff Writer

Wingate University Athletics Director Steve Poston and Head Football Coach Joe Reich announced the 2018 Wingate Football schedule in March. For the first time since 2002, Wingate University’s football team will have the upperhand of playing seven home games.

Coach Reich explained how the Bulldogs got lucky, “When we look for games sometimes we take what we can get. Last year we had a bye week but we also played the first two games on the road so we only had four home games in the regular season. When the scheduled flipped we immediately had six home games,” said Reich.

Coach Reich also said that,“Florida Tech really needed a game and was willing to come up here and play us at home so that’s how we got to seven. Florida Tech is a top quality out-of-conference opponent who will be a great new challenge. We know UNC Pembroke will be tough as well.”

The Bulldogs have played six home games on eight occasions, the most recent being in 2016. The Bulldogs will play a senior college school-record seven home games, beginning with a Thursday, August 30 contest versus local rival Johnson C. Smith at Irwin Belk Stadium and John R. Martin Field (7 p.m. start time).

“We are looking forward to opening on a Thursday night,” said Reich. “This will be a nice change up…having seven home games will be a good thing for us as well.”

Wingate will see many benefits from the seven home games and has many plans in store. The Bulldogs will host their annual special events throughout the 2018 home schedule including Church Youth Day, Patriots’ Day and Tailgating for the Troops. These events will influence larger crowds just as last year when the Bulldogs sold-out the first night game to ever be hosted by Wingate.

“The best thing about having seven home games would be that we wouldn’t have to travel as much plus it will be more fun for the school,” said Domineke McNeill, a sophomore running back. “Hearing the crowd pushes us more to be more physical and make more plays but for the other team they tend to get scared and fold.”

General admission season tickets range from $40 for adults and $20 for non-Wingate students. Single game tickets are $12 for adult and $8 for non-Wingate students. For more ticket or schedule information go to www.wingatebulldogs.com. We hope you join us this year as we continue to make history!

Edited by Brendan Shriver

Surging Bulldogs host men’s lacrosse SAC semifinal vs. LMU this afternoon

Ryan Mackintosh, Staff Writer 

The Wingate Bulldogs men’s lacrosse team is hoping to take advantage of some home field advantage throughout the South Atlantic Conference tournament here at Graham Gill Field this weekend.

The Bulldogs, 9-5 overall and 7-1 in the SAC,  are hosting the Final Four of the  Tournament this weekend. Wingate had a bye round in the quarterfinals by earning the No. 2 seed in the conference.

The team has caught fire at the right moment, winning five straight heading into the tournament, the most recent win coming in a close battle on Saturday, a 10-9 home victory over Queens, which is the tournament’s top seed.

Wingate plays No. 3 seed Lincoln Memorial University (14-3)  today at 1:30 p.m., a rematch which had the Bulldogs winning 11-10 on March 31.

“Everybody is ready and excited to play LMU again and I think we have a pretty good chance of going to the championship,” said senior Marc James.

Junior Christian Hall added, “We just don’t want the year to end.”

The Wingate-LMU winner will play the winner of the semifinal game between Queens and  No. 4 Lenoir-Rhyne for the championship on Sunday.

QUESTIONS OF THE WEEK: Winternational, end-of-year concerns, MLB Opening Day and Easter Break plans

The COM 220 News Writing class put together an Easter Break edition of Questions of the Week.

First up is Communication major Katie Williams of Calabash, answering class member Hunter Pearson‘s question: “Where would you like to go on a Winternational?” The Winternational reveal of destinations for 2018-19 took place on Wednesday afternoon.

Major League Baseball season opened on Thursday, but this student was unenthusiastic when Mariah Anderson and Shane Rich asked if she was going to be watching.

So what ARE students most concerned about as we get near the end of the school year? Well, we couldn’t get them on camera, but here are the responses of a few students when asked by Hanna Smith and Matthew Garza.

questionofweek

As this is being posted, Wingate students and faculty are on Easter Break. Class member Tanya Crump asked sophomore Caroline Downs and senior Amanda Lemacks (in order) about their plans.

And one more. Class member Caitlin Bailey asked freshman Simba Walker of Goldsboro about his Easter break plans. He said: “I work at a Circle K. Sadly, I won’t be doing any homework. Shout-out to my Mom.”

We loved the t-shirt. And the photobombing skateboarder.

simbawalker

Have a Happy Easter, everyone.

Tattered Pieces speaker addresses themes of loss, faith and forgiveness

Leah Joyner, Staff Writer

The Rev. Sharon Risher captured students’ attention with her raw emotion on Sunday morning, sharing how she became an accidental activist when she lost loved ones in the 2015 Charleston shooting at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church.  Risher, a native of Charlotte, N.C., spoke at a lyceum event at the Batte Center.  

“From the moment Rev. Risher started sharing her story, she evoked a spirit of passion that was astonishing. It was evident that she was unequivocally devoted to her beliefs,” said senior Tripp Wright.  

Risher described the struggle she went through finding out about the deaths of her mother, two cousins, and a childhood friend on that horrific night of June 17, 2015. Since the traumatic event, Risher has spoken up about gun laws in the nation and about her process of grieving and forgiving the shooter for his deed. Her touching testimony moved the audience to rethink ways in which to engage with people who look different from them and with the hope of bringing a positive change to the nation.


“Reverend Risher told her story as though it happened yesterday. She talked about being in the courtroom with her family’s murderer as though she had only just stepped out for a moment to tell you what was going on inside. While the terrible tragedy in Charleston did occur only two and a half years ago, she gave me a feeling that she would always tell her story like this. She would always relive that day with her heart on her sleeve, allowing herself to once again feel every feeling she felt the day her family was killed in hatred,” said freshman Karah Fleming.  

In her speech, Risher shared stories about her Christian faith getting her through the tough times in her life. Accompanied by her daughter, Aja, she admitted that it took a long time to forgive the shooter for what he did to her and her family, but she ultimately let go of her anger and gave it to the Lord.

“She didn’t try to tell us that her years of following God made her want to forgive right away. She had to wrestle with God about this time in her life,” Fleming commented. “Though I have yet to face something as difficult as what she was forced to face, her honesty about the battle she had to fight within herself to do God’s will was encouraging.”

 Risher has used her story to touch others on CNN, Time Magazine, BBC Radio and other media outlets. She has been a guest at the White House on several occasions when Barack Obama was president. A former hospital chaplain, Risher now spends her time as an activist and is writing a book.   

The Reverend’s conclusion to her speech sums up her purpose for speaking out to students and the public: “I didn’t ask for this journey I’m on. I would rather not be standing up here sharing this with you, but here I am. I hope you have heard one thing today that you didn’t know before. Something that will stir your heart to do something always for the betterment of yourself, so you can bring someone along who may not look like you or talk like you. We share this country and we must be the change we want to see.”

Edited by: Brea Childs

Pictured above: The Rev. Risher and daughter Aja Risher

Mental health problems facing college students all around

Aleah Cady, Staff Writer

College can be an exciting, enriching experience. For most young adults, college is their first step into the world of “adulthood”- that may mean living away from home, having a job, paying bills for the first time, and taking on the responsibilities of college-level courses.

College is a different experience for each student, but unfortunately for some, the fun parts of school such as making new friends, or having more freedom, are overshadowed by situations which can be stressful, and make school feel like a burden.

It can be pretty shocking to transition from four years of high school and living at home, and suddenly adapt to a faster-paced, unfamiliar environment which may mean living in a new city, state or even country; moving away from your friends and family, taking six or seven classes at a time, being responsible for student loans or bills, struggling to decide on a major, etc.

These experiences can be especially hard for students with mental illness, or those who struggle with stress. For these students, college can be less of a fun experience, and more of a contributor to their stress and worries. Sadly, the stress of college can often lead to heightened anxiety and depression, sleeping problems, poor school performance, or more serious issues including drug or alcohol abuse.

Some students even drop out of school entirely. According to a 2011 study from the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, 62% of students who withdrew from college before graduation did so because of poor mental health.

With the increasing prevalence of anxiety among young adults, mental health is being discussed more than ever before on campuses across the nation. Schools are making changes to accommodate students with mental illness, and help them succeed despite their differences.

Luckily at Wingate University, there are a variety of resources available to help students cope with their problems and be successful. One resource is the counseling services. Students can email the counseling department to set up an appointment to meet with a counselor that fits their schedule.

Students are welcome to discuss a variety of concerns from school, to grades, to social life, and beyond. You are meeting with a trained professional who can listen to your concerns, and help you understand your options.

Other helpful resources include the ARC, or Academic Resource Center. ARC offers tutoring services to all Wingate students, free of charge. You can receive help with studying or doing your homework, which can help improve your grades and give you more confidence in school.

If you are a student with a disability, you can turn to Disability Support Services for accommodations in concern to housing, testing, or other specific services that can help you. There are options to make school more comfortable for you, despite what challenges you may be facing.

If you’re a student struggling with mental illness or stress, you are not alone.In addition to reaching out and talking to a professional, you can also make small lifestyle changes to better your mental state.

  • Try to get enough sleep. It’s really hard when you have classes all day, and work and assignments to do at night, but try and get a twenty or thirty minute nap into your day, or take advantage of the weekends and get some rest.
  • Eat healthy foods, drink water, and exercise. Again, this may require changing your schedule up a bit, but take a few extra minutes a day to think about foods and drinks you’re putting into your body. Also, many studies show that light exercise such as going for a walk, or biking, can reduce stress levels, and improve your grades.
  • Avoid taking on too many responsibilities at once. You are at school to learn. Between academics, clubs, sports, work, homework, studying, and a social life, you can easily become overwhelmed. Evaluate what is really important to you, and try and cut out tasks or activities that stress you out. It’s okay to be human, and have weaknesses. Everybody needs a break sometimes.
  • Avoid drugs and alcohol in excess. They may feel like a temporary way to relax, but overusing drugs and alcohol use can increase stress levels, and result in more problems to face.
  • Know when to ask for help. It can be hard in such a fast-paced society to stop and say “I need help.” However, if you are struggling with self-harm, suicidal thoughts, or any other problems which may threaten your safety, it is important to get help immediately. Listed below are the phone numbers to contact Campus Safety, or the National Suicide Prevention Hotline. However, always call 911 in an emergency situation.
  • Remember that it’s okay to be stressed and worried. You aren’t alone, and it’s okay to cut yourself some slack every now and then. Take time to do things that make you happy, and try to cut out negative situations or people who may bring you down.

If you need help with a situation in which counseling services or any of the other resources mentioned above may not be able to help, here are a list of other resources you may turn to, especially if your safety is at risk:

➔ In an emergency situation, always call 911.

➔ Wingate Police (Non-emergency) (704)–233–5657

➔ Campus Safety (704)–233–8999

➔ National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800)-273-8255

Edited by: Brea Childs

 Photo from: Google Images

WU Alum First to Receive MASM Award

By Adam Riley II, Staff Writer

Wingate alum, Callie Phillips, was presented with the first Master of Arts in Sport Management Distinguished Alumni Award during an expert panel discussing Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence in College Athletics in Austin Auditorium last week.

“No one has to do everything, but everyone can do something to help stop sexual assault and domestic violence,” Phillips said.

She graduated from Wingate in 2013 with her master’s in sport administration and she is the current head volleyball coach at Johnson & Wales University.

Edited By Harrison Taylor, Dustin Kiggins, and Cierra Smith

 

WU Math Ed Majors attend NCCMT Conference

Laura Thompson, Staff Writer

Two Wingate University education majors are attending the North Carolina Council of Teachers of Mathematics for professional development experience.

Math professor, Dr. Laora Brizendine,  is taking two students, Matt Pugh and Shannon Moore, to the NCCMT conference. The conference is held annually in Greensboro and is sponsored by the NCCMT. It goes on for two days with sessions about technology in the classrooms.

“The reason that I want the students to go is because there are some sessions for first year teachers,” said Brizendine.

Brizendine said students will learn about some of the issues they may run into in their first, second and third year of teaching.

There are sessions for DESMOS tutorials, graphing calculators and college level math. Brizendine said these are going to be some of the most beneficial sessions for the attending students because it will allow the students to see technology in use.

Wingate students have been going to this conference for four years with Dr. Brizendine and Dr. Sandy Mills, although Mills will not be attending this year. This trip was made possible through a grant that Brizendine wrote and applied for through the Dean’s Office.

One student was surprised to hear that Wingate University offered the opportunity to attend math conferences.  

I am hoping to learn how to use LEGO bricks to teach math, how to connect math with literature and what new technology can help teach math.” said Middle Grades Education major, Matt Pugh.

There are sessions broken down by grade level, which will help guide the student attendees to the sessions that will best interest and benefit them. At the conference, there are also current practicing teachers that will present new ideas about what works best in the classroom.

There will also be several keynote speakers present at the conference,  such as Peg Smith and Jenny Bay Williams. The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction will also present on their status and what they are doing.

Edited by Gabriela Cabrera, Ryan Mackintosh, and Mason Teague