Tag Archives: Lyceum

Student Organization Brings Veterans Week to Campus

By: Matthew Myers, Staff Writer

Starting on Monday, Nov. 5, Wingate’s Student Veteran Organization and EKS are launching a week-long campaign for veterans awareness. Spearheaded by SVO and Friends of the Library, Veterans Week is promised to be filled with opportunities so that students may learn and have a better understanding of our military personnel.

Five lyceums will be held throughout the week. On Monday, Brigadier General Powell, Chief of Staff for the Army National Guard and father of Wingate student Taylor Powell, will be speaking about his career and service to others.

Marine Corps veteran, and author, Tracy Crow will present Lyceums on Tuesday and Wednesday covering her literary works. Crow will also conduct a workshop on Thursday, Nov. 9  about cathartic writing.

Thursday evening the campus will welcome Bonnie Amos, wife of the former Commandant of the Marine Corps, to discuss her 42 1/2 years as a military spouse. Her husband, General Amos, was the guest speaker on Founder’s Day 2017, and they have had a Wingate scholarship for grad school established in their honor.

Friday night, in McGee theatre, the SVO will be screening American Sniper and conducting a panel discussion/Q&A with student veterans who have served overseas.

Additionally, there will be interactive displays and events, daily, from 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. outside Starbucks with SWAG for those students who participate. The events will vary and are subject to change, but students will be exposed to various elements of military life.

Saturday will be the “bookend” for the week as Tailgating for the Troops will be at the football game having banners signed to send overseas and SVO will be announcing the winner of the corn hole board raffle at halftime.

What should students expect to get out of this week? According to Gordon Sprague with SVO, “Students should expect to get out of this what they put into it. It sounds cliché, however, that is a cliché that is ingrained into every recruit from the first day of basic training. The end goal for the week is to provide a unique insight to students unfamiliar with the military. It is our hope that they become more aware of the adversity faced and diversity brought to the university by veterans.”

Veterans Week is not limited to students. According to Sprague, “If students have friends, family, or community members that are veterans and/or supporters of the military that would like to attend any of these events, make sure they invite them.”

Edited By: Rachael Robinson

Speaker Kevin Hines shares his story of suicide and second chances

Sarah Thurman, Staff Writer

On Thursday, February 22, Kevin Hines came to Wingate to give a lecture titled Cracked Not Broken, The Kevin Hines Story. Kevin Hines was only 19 when he decided that he wanted to take his life by jumping off the Golden Gate bridge.  This is a jump that 99% of people, do not live from. Kevin was in that 1% that lived.

The lecture began by showing a snippet of Kevin’s film titled ‘Suicide: The Ripple Effect.’ Kevin came on stage and introduced himself, then proceeded to explain how he was not there to just tell his story, he was here to inform us by using his story.

Telling a story of a suicide attempt can get very dark, yet when Kevin felt that the mood was shifting he would give a joke that would make the whole audience laugh. Once he saw that the audience was in fact laughing he would go back into the story.

During one of the darkest parts of the story, when Kevin is describing himself jumping off the bridge and into the water, he realized that he didn’t die and that there was a creature swimming around him. He said, “I remember thinking ‘You’ve got to be kidding me, I didn’t die off the Golden Gate bridge and now a shark is going to devour me. NO!” The audience mood instantly lightened at the joke.

He went back into describing how this creature was keeping his body afloat and taking him towards a boat. With no idea what was under him, he decided to name the creature “Herbert” and after he began to tell his story publicly, he was contacted and informed that the creature that was under him was a Sea Lion.

Suprisingly the story does not end there, he continues to recount the story of his recovery and how he has gotten to the point he’s at today. He tells of his time spent in psych wards, fixing his relationship with his father, and meeting his wife. He does not just outline the negative parts, but he dives into the positive ones as well.

He ended the lecture by telling the audience that even though he stands here to tell his story that he still struggles everyday with a mental illness, but “I’ve been given the gift of a second chance, and most people in that situation sadly never got to see.”  

Kevin then tied the lecture together with a simple statement and a joke, “Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, today is a gift, that I believe is why we call it the present and if ya’ll don’t believe me Master Oogway from Kung Foo Panda said that.”

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Left to Right- Nya Henderson, Kevin Hines, Aliyah Long. Photo credit: Sarah Thurman

After he finished, he asked the audience to stand and he pulled out his phone and asked us to scream “Be Here Tomorrow” as loud as possible.  After the event Kevin went into the lobby of the Batte Center and met with students. Many people approached him to inform him of the impact of his story and some even pulled him aside to talk privately. Counseling was also on duty if anyone felt the need to talk to someone during or after the event.

If you or someone you know needs to talk to someone, Wingate University offers free confidential counseling to students, you can contact them at counseling@wingate.edu. To learn more about Kevin’s story visit http://www.kevinhinesstory.com/.

Edited by: Brea Childs

Tattered Pieces speaker addresses themes of loss, faith and forgiveness

Leah Joyner, Staff Writer

The Rev. Sharon Risher captured students’ attention with her raw emotion on Sunday morning, sharing how she became an accidental activist when she lost loved ones in the 2015 Charleston shooting at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church.  Risher, a native of Charlotte, N.C., spoke at a lyceum event at the Batte Center.  

“From the moment Rev. Risher started sharing her story, she evoked a spirit of passion that was astonishing. It was evident that she was unequivocally devoted to her beliefs,” said senior Tripp Wright.  

Risher described the struggle she went through finding out about the deaths of her mother, two cousins, and a childhood friend on that horrific night of June 17, 2015. Since the traumatic event, Risher has spoken up about gun laws in the nation and about her process of grieving and forgiving the shooter for his deed. Her touching testimony moved the audience to rethink ways in which to engage with people who look different from them and with the hope of bringing a positive change to the nation.


“Reverend Risher told her story as though it happened yesterday. She talked about being in the courtroom with her family’s murderer as though she had only just stepped out for a moment to tell you what was going on inside. While the terrible tragedy in Charleston did occur only two and a half years ago, she gave me a feeling that she would always tell her story like this. She would always relive that day with her heart on her sleeve, allowing herself to once again feel every feeling she felt the day her family was killed in hatred,” said freshman Karah Fleming.  

In her speech, Risher shared stories about her Christian faith getting her through the tough times in her life. Accompanied by her daughter, Aja, she admitted that it took a long time to forgive the shooter for what he did to her and her family, but she ultimately let go of her anger and gave it to the Lord.

“She didn’t try to tell us that her years of following God made her want to forgive right away. She had to wrestle with God about this time in her life,” Fleming commented. “Though I have yet to face something as difficult as what she was forced to face, her honesty about the battle she had to fight within herself to do God’s will was encouraging.”

 Risher has used her story to touch others on CNN, Time Magazine, BBC Radio and other media outlets. She has been a guest at the White House on several occasions when Barack Obama was president. A former hospital chaplain, Risher now spends her time as an activist and is writing a book.   

The Reverend’s conclusion to her speech sums up her purpose for speaking out to students and the public: “I didn’t ask for this journey I’m on. I would rather not be standing up here sharing this with you, but here I am. I hope you have heard one thing today that you didn’t know before. Something that will stir your heart to do something always for the betterment of yourself, so you can bring someone along who may not look like you or talk like you. We share this country and we must be the change we want to see.”

Edited by: Brea Childs

Pictured above: The Rev. Risher and daughter Aja Risher

Lyceum on sexual assault among college athletes leaves students confused

Gabby Cabrera, Staff Writer

In a lecture lyceum titled, Above the law: Sexual Assault & Domestic Violence in College Athletics, students were briefed about the prevalence of sexual assault in college athletics but many were left confused and disappointed, prompting university leaders to consider the need for more education.

“I thought it was confusing. All three seemed to have different opinions but tried to find a consensus,” said sophomore Marisa Ostoja about the Lyceum. “What I thought would be about sexual assault in sports, turned into a lesson about law.”

Students of Wingate University were left with more questions than answers as the panel, Athletics Director for Internal Operations  Dr. Renae Myles from Winthrop University, Director of Compliance Hank Harrawood from UNC-Charlotte and Coordinator of Sexual Trauma of Safe Alliance Dr. Norman Spencer, debated the issues surrounding sexual assault in college athletics. The organization Safe Alliance works with victims of domestic abuse and is based in Charlotte.

Dr. Dawn Norwood, the Director of Graudate Programs in the School of Sports Sciences at Wingate, said the panel discussion was originally established for the students of the master’s program but decided to open it up to all students by making it a Lyceum. However after the event, she said she is disappointed to know that many of the students were unaware of Title IX from the start.

“As a result of the panel discussion, I do see the need for all student body to be educated on Title IX by faculty and staff,” said Norwood.  “It’s our responsibility to make sure that students are informed and know where to go.”

During the event, Myles asked the audience if they knew where to go or what to do in case of an assault. A few students hesitantly replied, but none were sure.

Myles said it is important for students to know where and what resources are available in case an assault happens.

“You have somewhere to go,” said Myles. “Know where you should go.”

The panelists offered suggestions such as campus safety and contacting Title IX coordinator, Patrick Biggerstaff.

Norwood began the presentation with two videos. Both were network coverages of two sexual assault cases, one at Baylor University, and the other involving Brock Turner, a swimmer at Stanford University.

The Baylor case involves prosecutors claiming multiple former football players sexually assaulted women. A federal lawsuit claims university officials failed to respond sufficiently to the accusations.

The Brock Turner case convicted the former swimmer of sexually assaulting an unconscious woman. The lawsuit drew national attention after the victim’s impact statement went viral and the judge sentenced Turner to only six months in jail.

Norwood used the videos as an example to highlight the important issue of sexual assault and domestic violence on college campuses. She said as many as one in five women and one in 16 men become victims of sexual assault while in college.

For many students at the Lyceum, those statistics combined with the high-profile examples were a riveting combination.

“Dr. Norwood’s opening had me hooked,” said junior Shelby Dworek. “The videos and introduction statement were perfect. That’s why I was so disappointed in the rest of the program.”

Dr. Norwood asked the panel numerous questions about defining the term “lack of consent” and acknowledging available resources for victims. The panel also discussed the removal of the 2011 Title IX “Dear Colleague” letter which added extra protection to victim complaints and stripped nearly all protection from the accused.

Dworek said that while Dr. Norwood’s questions were clear and concise, the panelists’ answers were muddled and confusing.

“They kept referring to Title XI and the “Dear Colleague” letter, but I didn’t even know what that was!” said Dworek. “I felt a huge disconnection between myself and the panel.”

That disconnection came from the debate taking a legal turn, which Norwood said is not surprising since sexual assault is a very legal matter.

Norwood referred to the panelists as “passionate about their topic” and “answering from a position of expertise” when asked about the disunion between panel and student body.

“Perhaps the panel were so enthralled with the questions and topic that they began to speak as though with associates as opposed to bringing it down to meet the students’ needs,” said Norwood.

One student said she found the discussion, though a bit confusing, very informative.

“It is important to realize that sexual assault should not be tolerated,” said junior Sydney Homan. “I think the panel had a lot of knowledge and insight on sexual assault cases so it was interesting to hear stories from their perspective.”

Homan said sexual assault is something all college students should be knowledgeable about so that they will have the courage to bring cases forward.  

The discussion panel ended by recommending Safe Alliance to those who were interested in more information about sexual assault and domestic violence.

Edited by: Brea Childs

Lyceum Requirement Changes Cause Confusion, Relief for Many Students

Savanna Harris, Staff Writer

When the word “Lyceum” is mentioned around the Wingate University campus, one would immediately think of a program put into place to enrich students and to broaden their educational experience. It offers students the opportunity to attend for lectures, performances, etc. that they might otherwise not be able to attend.

Even though Lyceums are a graduation requirement, they are not viewed as a burden. In fact, the majority of students get excited when an interesting Lyceum is announced.

Until this year, students were required to attend 40 Lyceums in order to complete the conditions for graduation. At the start of the 2017 school year, however, the requirement was dropped to 24.

Incoming freshmen shared an overall feeling of reprieve in learning this new information, seeing that it made college seem a little less overwhelming. Upperclassmen on the other hand, met the change with a different reaction.

Since they came to Wingate under the 40 Lyceum requirement, it wasn’t clear if the change applied to them too. Dr. Christy Carter, Associate Professor of Biology and Chair of the Lyceum Committee, was able to offer some insight.

As it turns out, the change in the number of required Lyceums applies to EVERYONE, including upperclassman who were enrolled under the original requirement.

The main cause for the change was an overall accommodation issue. With the incoming freshmen class, along with the whole student body, increasing every year, there simply wasn’t enough large areas to seat and host the events in.

Another large factor, Dr. Carter said, was intentionality, and wanting the Lyceum experience to be meaningful and enjoyable rather than oppressive. Commuter and nontraditional students and their unique situations were taken into consideration, as well. “We want students to chose Lyceums they feel they’ll actually get something out of instead of just checking off boxes for a graduation requirement.”

The change was made under the impression that students will be able to get the same benefits from going to 24 Lyceums as they could from going to 40. And thankfully, the changes seem to be a success. “So far, all of the feedback I’ve gotten from students has been good. Some faculty didn’t want the change, but there were enough who did want it for it to happen.”

For now, however, this is the only major change that is being made to the program anytime soon. The categories will remain the same, as well as attendance policies. If any other changes are made soon, they will be mainly for refinement purposes. “I think the Lyceum program should be reevaluated regularly and adapted to current situations on campus,” Dr. Carter said, “so the program will be as beneficial as possible to all who are involved.”

Edited by: Brea Childs

Lyceum preps students for successful interviews

Joanna King, Staff Writer

Going into an interview is all about having a great pair of shoes according to a panel of experts, with 130 years of combined knowledge, who hosted a Lyceum at Wingate University on Monday night.

“You can ruin a good business outfit with shoes that aren’t appropriate,” said panel member Steve Poston, the vice president and athletic director of Wingate University. “If you look like you have been out in the field plowing in the shoes you wear, it will ruin the outfit.”

Poston was one of the five-panel members to in the Lyceum discussion that allowed attending students a glimpse of why what you wear matters when it comes to getting a job. Each individual agreed that it takes only three things to make a good first impression: a nice suit for men, a professional blazer for women and a great pair of shoes are all it takes to make a good first impression.

“Somebody once told me to remember to interview for the job you want, not the job you have,” said Poston.

“It is very important to set yourself apart when making your first impression,” said Lynette Kennedy, a retail business woman for over 20 years. Tahira Stalberte, the assistant superintendent for Union County Public Schools, added onto Kennedy’s statement.

“Even though standing apart is important, make sure you yourself are not a distraction from the interview.”

All five experts agreed a candidate’s interview attire profoundly impacts the employer’s assessment of his qualifications. Kennedy said the employer may even judge a candidate’s character on what he looks like when he walks through the door to an interview.

“They really put an emphasis on first impressions,” Said Sierra Street, a sophomore at Wingate University. “It is very important to remain clean-cut and professional while still standing out enough to make that first impression last.”

Edited by Andrew Elliott and Malik Bledsoe

 

 

Southern Circuit film series debuts for a third year at Wingate

Ryan McKeel, Staff Writer

The Union County Community Arts Council and the George A. Batte, JR. Fine Arts Center at Wingate University have joined together for the third straight year to sponsor multiple free film screenings as part of the Southern Circuit Film Series.

The next film in the series, at 7 p,m. Wednesday, will be “Dalya’s Other Country.”

Founded in 1975 as a community project attempting to build on southern heritage, South Arts, the creative organization behind the film tour, is the largest artistic council in the southeast. The Southern Circuit Tour of Independent Filmmakers, often referred to simply as the Southern Circuit, is a brainchild of South Arts and is the nation’s first regional tour of independent filmmakers.

“Southern Circuit was developed to connect audiences with new, independent films that they normally wouldn’t have an opportunity to experience,” said Teresa Hollingsworth, Senior Program Director at South Arts in a 2014 interview. “We send directors into communities for screenings as well as audience discussions about their work and the filmmaking process.

The Southern Circuit will be visiting Wingate University for the third year in a row. With free admission and Lyceum credit available to students, the tour aims to provide both the filmmakers and audience members with an opportunity to grow.

“South Arts works collaboratively with screening partners to expand their programming and to provide audiences with the opportunity to meet filmmakers and learn about the art of filmmaking,” says the Circuit’s website.

Laura Kratt, Director of Cultural Events at the Batte, graciously noted the generosity the Union County Community Arts Council in their grant sponsorship of the films. “None of this would be possible without the help of the arts council,” said Kratt. “I hope that students engage in a productive conversation with the film’s directors.”

The films that will be screened at the Batte center each have a different genre and theme, yet all will tackle various global topics.

Between “Do Not Resist”, a film that explores the militarization of local police departments—in their tactics, training, and acquisition of equipment—since 9/11, and “Dalya’s Other Country”, a project that tells the nuanced story of members of a family displaced by the Syrian conflict, audience members will explore the stories of people and organizations affected in various ways by wartime tragedies.

While viewing both “Swim Team”, a film about parents with a child on the autism spectrum who form a competitive swim team, or “First Lady of the Revolution”, the remarkable story of Henrietta Boggs, audience members will admire the passion and endurance felt by those of us with a powerful mission.

All viewers will find a common idea of hope in the films. The important message disguised in different global experiences is something that artists and community members alike can bond over. Audience members will have the opportunity to engage in a rich dialogue with the film directors about the content and impact of the films after each screening in a Q & A session.

More information on the films, dates and show times can be found at battecenter.org

Edited by: Brea Childs

Photot Credit: Batte Center