Speaker Kevin Hines shares his story of suicide and second chances

Sarah Thurman, Staff Writer

On Thursday, February 22, Kevin Hines came to Wingate to give a lecture titled Cracked Not Broken, The Kevin Hines Story. Kevin Hines was only 19 when he decided that he wanted to take his life by jumping off the Golden Gate bridge.  This is a jump that 99% of people, do not live from. Kevin was in that 1% that lived.

The lecture began by showing a snippet of Kevin’s film titled ‘Suicide: The Ripple Effect.’ Kevin came on stage and introduced himself, then proceeded to explain how he was not there to just tell his story, he was here to inform us by using his story.

Telling a story of a suicide attempt can get very dark, yet when Kevin felt that the mood was shifting he would give a joke that would make the whole audience laugh. Once he saw that the audience was in fact laughing he would go back into the story.

During one of the darkest parts of the story, when Kevin is describing himself jumping off the bridge and into the water, he realized that he didn’t die and that there was a creature swimming around him. He said, “I remember thinking ‘You’ve got to be kidding me, I didn’t die off the Golden Gate bridge and now a shark is going to devour me. NO!” The audience mood instantly lightened at the joke.

He went back into describing how this creature was keeping his body afloat and taking him towards a boat. With no idea what was under him, he decided to name the creature “Herbert” and after he began to tell his story publicly, he was contacted and informed that the creature that was under him was a Sea Lion.

Suprisingly the story does not end there, he continues to recount the story of his recovery and how he has gotten to the point he’s at today. He tells of his time spent in psych wards, fixing his relationship with his father, and meeting his wife. He does not just outline the negative parts, but he dives into the positive ones as well.

He ended the lecture by telling the audience that even though he stands here to tell his story that he still struggles everyday with a mental illness, but “I’ve been given the gift of a second chance, and most people in that situation sadly never got to see.”  

Kevin then tied the lecture together with a simple statement and a joke, “Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, today is a gift, that I believe is why we call it the present and if ya’ll don’t believe me Master Oogway from Kung Foo Panda said that.”

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Left to Right- Nya Henderson, Kevin Hines, Aliyah Long. Photo credit: Sarah Thurman

After he finished, he asked the audience to stand and he pulled out his phone and asked us to scream “Be Here Tomorrow” as loud as possible.  After the event Kevin went into the lobby of the Batte Center and met with students. Many people approached him to inform him of the impact of his story and some even pulled him aside to talk privately. Counseling was also on duty if anyone felt the need to talk to someone during or after the event.

If you or someone you know needs to talk to someone, Wingate University offers free confidential counseling to students, you can contact them at counseling@wingate.edu. To learn more about Kevin’s story visit http://www.kevinhinesstory.com/.

Edited by: Brea Childs

John Pavlovitz speaks to Wingate campus about creating a bigger table

Rachael Robinson, Staff Writer

John Pavlovitz spoke to Wingate students, faculty and staff last Wednesday. Pavlovitz is a pastor, blogger and the author of the novel A Bigger Table. He spoke to the audience about expanding their horizons and opening up themselves to new people, with his theory of “creating a bigger table.”

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Photo credit: Pavlovitz website

When Pavlovitz speaks of creating a bigger table, he has an image in his brain. The table in his parents’ home. He mentioned that his house “was just an expensive covering for the kitchen.”    

His family started spending time around the kitchen table. As their family and friends grew, they moved to the larger dining room table. He then remembers his father going to the garage and having he and his brothers help add wood to make the table even bigger

Expanding your personal “table” though takes practice. It must be built upon using the four foundations which he calls the legs. The foundations of radical hospitality, total authenticity, true diversity and agenda-free relationships.

Everyone should be welcome, regardless of whether their ideals match yours, no one should feel they need to be an edited version of themselves.  It should be a safe place for everyone and a place to just hear stories. You also can’t be afraid of people leaving your table. People might not fit and that’s okay.

Pavlovitz also spoke about activism. Activism doesn’t have to be standing on the side of a street holding a sign and yelling at individuals as they pass. “Activism is using your privilege to raise up others,” Pavlovitz explains. “Use whatever is at your disposal.”

You could end up on the street with a sign, but activism can be simple. Taking a stand during conversations with your extended family when you would normally walk out or posting comments on social media posts that you think are wrong is enough.Both he admits “may go horribly wrong,” but that’s the point. Activism can be costly and painful.

Pavlovitz grew up in New York. His family was behind him 100 percent and he felt the same way about God. He didn’t realize until he went to college in Philadelphia just how many “false” stories he had been told about the world. He realized that he felt that he was above the people who weren’t like him.

Philadelphia was full of new stories, he felt like a fish that had been thrown into a new aquarium too quickly. He was having all these experiences and felt like he was using new muscles. He realized he was beginning to care. His table was growing.  

A pivotal moment for Pavlovitz was when he was asked to replace the youth leader at the church he attended outside of Philadelphia. That is where he fell in love with preaching. When someone suggested getting paid, he figured he would give it a try. Pavlovitz and his wife would then move to Charlotte, where he would become the pastor of a mega Methodist Church.

During this period Pavlovitz began to have theological questions about the messages he was spreading. He realized that his table had gotten smaller again. He was always surrounded by people from the church. He also began to notice that the only people who were welcomed at the church were people who fit the mold. There were no “marginalized” people.

That’s when Pavolvitz started writing. He started his blog where he could write about these issues. “All I did was speak my truth and I got a bigger table” said Pavolvitz.

Edited by: Brea Childs

SGA looks foward to a better future for the Wingate campus

Shane Rich, Staff Writer

While the new semester is kicking into gear, Wingate’s Student Government Association shifts focus on bettering student experiences on campus. Even though in past years SGA has done much for the student body, they look to build on that momentum to make campus life even better for the future.

According to the President of SGA Amanda Alling, “some of the things SGA has planned for this upcoming semester includes our weekly Coffee in the Quad events from 9-10 am every single Tuesday, located in the Academic Quad. We do this to provide a quick bite to eat and engage with some students on campus. We [also] hold a portion of a meeting called, ‘#WUVOICE’ which is a time for students to give their own announcements and ask questions.” Alling also spoke about how she is excited to see what the future holds for SGA, especially when it comes to the development of underclassmen.

When asked about how SGA will be run differently this semester as compared to past semesters , Alling responded, “Things are not going to be done super differently, but we are placing more of an emphasis on engagement this year. We want everyone’s experiences with SGA to be meaningful and impactful. One of our most important missions is to ensure that this happens and that every single student feels valued and important at Wingate University,” which is something SGA has done and continues to do for many years.

“As far as becoming an actual member, elections are held at the end of the school year for Executive Board positions and senator committee positions.” Alling said. 

SGA also has a summer planning retreat, in which they take the time to outline their goals for Wingate and the student body. These goals as well as the SGA mission statement are outlined below.

Goals:

Create and utilize a marketing and communication plan to efficiently and effectively promote and connect students with SGA.

Enhance the student experience through increasing involvement in SGA and campus activities, while creating avenues to promote and cultivate Bulldog Spirit.

Using effective and efficient planning to better define and delegate SGA roles, expectations, and engagement within committees and events.

Mission Statement:

We are devoted to developing a student-powered organization that effectively directs the student’s vision into reality as well as reflecting the standards and values of Wingate University. SGA also strives to serve as an organization that aims to create unity and pride in the community.

Edited by: Brea Childs

Student Athlete Spotlight: Hannah Hinson

Mason Teague, Staff Writer

A ton of athletes across different sports tell about how they have always loved playing their sport ever since they were a little kid. In the case of junior women’s track & field student-athlete Hannah Hinson of Suffolk, Va., being a thrower began during her freshman year in high school.

At a football game her freshman year, Hinson was approached by a P.E. teacher, who encouraged her to come out for throwing on the school’s track & field team that spring.  She decided to take the chance and try out, which proved to be one of the best choices she ever made.

“I immediately fell in love with throwing when I started,” says Hinson.  “It felt really natural from the beginning and I knew that it was something that I wanted to get good at.”

Hinson threw discus and shotput all four years of high school at Kings Fork High, and decided her senior year to pursue her passion at the collegiate level at Wingate.  The transition from throwing in high school to college, however, was a lot more difficult than she anticipated.

“It was definitely a big change in terms of the different training styles between high school and college, as well as how much more the coaching staff at Wingate demands of you than high school coaches,” says Hinson.“But the coaches at Wingate have pushed me to be better every day since I’ve been here, which really helped me to get used to everything very quickly.”

Hinson throws hammer, discus and shotput for the outdoor and indoor Women’s Track & Field team, and has had a large amount of success in the two years she has participated.  She broke the school record for indoor hammer throw, also known as weight throw, at the JDL Fast Track Meet in 2016, as well as winning All-SAC honors for hammer throw (2016, 2017) and discus (2017).

As she continues to challenge herself each season, Hinson has created two personal goals for herself during her junior season.

“I want to be the first thrower in Wingate history to make Nationals for indoor this year,” says Hinson.  “I also want to win discus and hammer throw in the SAC for outdoor this year.”

As the new season begins, Hinson sees a lot of potential for her team as they compete against other schools in the SAC conference.

“We challenge each other every day by competing against one another to be the best at our sport out of the entire team,” Hinson says.“I believe that this healthy competition is going to help us when we compete against other throwers because we will already have that competitive edge that we give one another on the team.”

 

Edited by Brendan Shriver

Wingate comes back on Miscenko’s strong second half performance

JT Stokes, Staff Writer

Marta Miscenko’s 28 point effort pushes #21 Wingate (19-3, (13-2 SAC) to a 70-59 SAC victory over LMU (13-10, 9-8 SAC).

Wingate won their eighth straight game thanks to efforts from Wingate University senior center Marta Miscenko, who recorded her 22nd career double-double with 28 points and 10 rebounds, helping the Bulldogs in another South Atlantic Conference women’s basketball victory over Lincoln Memorial University Saturday afternoon in Cuddy Arena.

The defending South Atlantic Conference tournament champions are undefeated at home with a 12-0 record during the 2017-18 season. Bulldog juniors Caroline Averette, Danasia Witherspoon, and Courtney Robinson combined for 31 points in the win.

For Lincoln Memorial, junior guard Emily Griffith had 17 points. Freshman center Cameryn DuBose matched Miscenko’s double-double with 12 points and 11 rebounds. Senior guard Shea Coker contributed 11 points in the loss.

Box Score Notables

LMU lead Wingate 44-43 at the end of the third quarter. Wingate outscored LMU 27-15 in the fourth quarter.

Miscenko had 13 points alone in the fourth quarter.

The Bulldogs shot 80 percent from the floor in the fourth quarter.

LMU shot 26 percent from the floor in the fourth quarter.

Wingate outrebounded LMU 41-32. Witherspoon had nine rebounds.

The game changed leads eight times.

What happened

First Quarter: LMU led Wingate 16-14 after the first quarter. Wingate went only 4-of 22 from the floor shooting a low 18.2 percent. The first quarter alone had four tie scores and four lead changes.

Second Quarter: Lincoln Memorial gained an eight point advantage in the first minutes in the second quarter, which was LMU’s biggest lead of the afternoon. Wingate outscored LMU 11-2 to end the second quarter putting the Bulldogs up 30-28 at halftime. Miscenko lead the way with 11 points in the first half.

Third Quarter: Wingate added to their halftime lead by scoring the first 6 points of the period. LMU responded immediately scoring eight unanswered points to tie the game 36-36 on a three-point field goal by junior guard Rachel Griffith. LMU outscored the Bulldogs to make the score 44-40 LMU with 1:24 to go but Wingate junior guard Taylor Helms answered with a three-point field goal on the other end to finish the scoring in the third.

Fourth Quarter: A strong fourth quarter ended the game for the Bulldogs. The Bulldogs responded went on a 10-0 run, concluded by two Witherspoon free throws with 3:18 left, which gave Wingate its largest lead of the afternoon at 61-47. LMU would not get within seven points in the final stretch and Miscenko made five-of-six field goals and three-of-four free throws in the fourth quarter to help the Bulldogs turn the tide.

“Once again, the second effort was strong. Marta came alive in the second half and gave them some problems. We did a good job of getting her the ball where she could be successful. Winning the boards and getting to the line was big. Every game is important and this one was no different. We know winning at home is crucial,” Wingate Head Coach Ann Hancock said.

“Our team really comes alive in the fourth quarter defensively. We feel like there’s a certain sense of urgency that our team has. We were able to buckle down and get a good win,” Marta Miscenko said.

Wingate will be on the road against the Lenoir-Rhyne Bears (14-11, 8-9 SAC) on Wednesday, February 14th at 6 pm.

Edited by Brendan Shriver

 

Wingate blown out by LMU in Men’s Basketball

Philip Harris, Staff Writer

The Wingate Men’s Basketball team (12-12, 9-7 SAC) was unable to keep up with the high-powered #1 team in the country, falling to the Lincoln Memorial Railsplitters (23-1, 17-0 SAC) 93-65 on Saturday afternoon.

Wingate started the game off hot, jumping out to a 13-10 lead early in the first half of the game. LMU, however, scored the next eight points to take an 18-13 lead on a Dorian Pinson layup with 9:16 left in the half. The Bulldogs were able to pull within three on a Marco Haskin’s three-point play, but the Railspittters went on to score 19 out of the next 21 points and the visitors led 49-29 at halftime.

“We got away from the game plan for a brief moment, but that is all it takes against them,” said coach Brian Good when asked about the first half.     

The second half didn’t get any better for the Bulldogs with the Railsplitters going on a 21-5 run pushing the lead to a game-high of 34 points. Jeremy Williams scored 8 straight points for Wingate to chop the lead down to 26. The closest the Bulldogs got the rest of the way was 22 points.

Trevon Shaw led the Railsplitters with 24 points while shooting eight-of-12 from three-point range. Emanuel Terry also had 22 points and 11 rebounds going eight-for-11 from the field.

Freshman guard Kendrick Tucker had 14 points to lead the Bulldogs offense, and also added three steals and two rebounds. Junior guard Marco Haskins also had 14 points along with five rebounds.

Wingate will look to rebound on Wednesday when they travel to Lenoir-Rhyne (10-13, 8-9 SAC) for an 8pm tip off.

Edited by Brendan Shriver  

Bulldogs come up short against Queens in men’s basketball

Wessli-Ann Hardee, Staff Writer

The Wingate University Bulldogs Men’s Basketball team (12-11, 9-6 SAC) put up a strong fight against the #2 team in the country, Queens University (22-1, 14-1 SAC), but unfortunately fell short of a victory with a score of 88 – 71, on Wednesday night in Cuddy Arena.

“It will take a perfect game to beat the #2 team in the country,” said Wingate Assistant coach Marcus Kirkland before Wednesday night’s game.

A perfect game was what the Bulldogs strived for, as they put up a strong first half against the Royals.

Marco Haskins started the first half with a 3-pointer in the first minute of play. The Bulldogs trailed the Royals the entire first half, as it seemed the Royals had an answer for Wingate’s every move. The Bulldogs were down by eight with a score of 41-33 going into halftime.

“I felt we played very hard to start the game. We threw them off with our zone and it took them a while to figure it out,” said Wingate senior guard Zeriq Lolar.

The Bulldogs came out with a vengeance in the second half. They were within two points against the Royals, six minutes into the half after a dunk by Quantra Taylor.

But due to several turnovers in the last 14 minutes, the Bulldogs allowed the Royals to overtake them, sending them to their 11th loss of the season.

“Once the second half started, we had a good energy, but then around the 12-minute mark we fell apart and didn’t play well. We lacked communication within our zone and that led to wide open layups and threes,” said Lolar.

Hoskins lead the team with 21 total points, followed by Lolar with 10 points and Quantra Taylor grabbed 11 rebounds. Todd Withers lead the Royals with 19 points, going 8-of-12 from the field and Ike Agusi led the Royals in the rebounding column with four.

The Bulldogs have now lost four straight games to Queens after beating the Royals twice during the regular season last year. Queens defeated Wingate in the South Atlantic Conference Tournament Championship Game and in the first round of the Division II Regionals a year ago.

The Bulldogs are back in action when they face Lincoln Memorial (22-1, 16-0 SAC) on Saturday, at 4 p.m. in Cuddy Arena. LMU is leading the conference and is #1 in the nation in Division II, so Wingate must regroup quickly if they want to pull off a monumental upset after taking #2 Queens to the wire for most of the game.  

Edited by Brendan Shriver