Student Videographer Brings Wingate Student-Athletes into Spotlight

By: Jared Overstreet, Staff Writer 

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Photo Credit:  Bailey Goforth

Wingate University’s athletic program has grown rapidly over the past few years.  Wingate University’s athletic videographer, Julian Irigoyen, helps make sure that the sports teams are getting the attention they deserve.

“My job is to create video content that promotes Wingate Athletics”, said Irigoyen, who leads a team with two other videographers, who are current and former athletes of Wingate University.   

Being a student-athlete himself — a cross country runner — Irigoyen goes above and beyond to create videos for the students at Wingate. Whenever Irigoyen has time in between class, practice, and studying, he edits and records video content.

Irigoyen, a junior from Bakersfield, Calif., explains having an inspiration to work makes a job feel less like a job.  “I have always enjoyed creating videos and I was inspired when it was recognizable that Wingate University was lacking video content displaying the level of athleticism at a Division II program.”

Ever since he came up with the idea, all the sports team at Wingate have been given more spotlight.  Social Media websites like Twitter and Instagram are very popular around the world and Irigoyen’s videos are perfect for that.  His footage gets uploaded constantly to social media accounts for Wingate Athletics and the views are only increasing.

“Being able to do what I love while getting to watch every team on campus is my favorite part of the job.”

Edited By: Rachael Robinson

Cheerleaders Raise Funds for National Competiton

By: Addison Mixson, Staff Writer

As the Wingate University’s Cheerleaders focus on cheering on their Bulldogs during this year’s football and basketball seasons, they are working just as hard to fundraise for their trip to the National Cheerleaders Association (NCA) College Nationals in Daytona Beach, Florida in the Spring.

The NCA national competition that they attend is an excellent experience for the girls on the team.  Mary Keener, a sophomore on the team explains, “I’m really excited to go to Nationals because it’s a great experience for our team and promotes the name of our school to other universities and people across the country who also participate in the event.”

Before school started, the team had already begun a T-shirt fundraiser. They have also recently started hosting concessions for all of this season’s Carolina Panthers home football games, along with additional events like soccer games, ACC Championship, Bowl Games and Playoff Games, with the opportunity to earn a portion of their sales.

Mia Fowler, a junior cheerleader, and head of the fundraiser says each person that comes to help with the concessions has the ability to earn money from tips. Fowler is excited to show her dedication to the team, making sure that the team will benefit.

Coach Kelly Sheppard describes the team’s efforts, “Our team works very hard to raise money each year! Now that we are participating in the NCA College Nationals competition, we are working hard to raise more than ever. In addition to working at the Bank of America Stadium events, we will also host our annual Mini-Bulldog Cheer Camp in February. This is an event that we look forward to each year–there is nothing better than sharing our passion with young children and then watching them perform all that they have learned!”

Ciarrah Brown, a freshman cheerleader, describes the journey ahead, “It will be challenging, but the ends justify the means. It will be all worth it when we’re having fun at nationals.”

Edited By: Rachael Robinson

Student Advice to Freshmen

 By: Sarah Everhart, Staff Writer

Freshman year is a new and exciting time, but can also be a very confusing time for a lot of students. The first year of college is one of the most stressful, life-changing years of a student’s life. Many people choose their major, participate in clubs, greek life, or other organizations and find their life-long friends during this time.

One thing that most, if not all, freshmen have in common is that they could benefit from some advice at this point in the year.

Senior, Regan Huneycutt, suggests“to push yourself and reach for things you never thought you could accomplish,” over the next four years. Reflecting on her college years, she says, “It’s an amazing feeling to look back as you are about to graduate on all the things you never imagined you could do and look forward to the bright future you have ahead of you because of all you have done.”

One very imperative thing to do while in college is to get involved and to make friends and memories.

Emily Holbrook, a senior at Wingate reflects, “I am so thankful for everything this university has given me- I would not be who I am today if it wasn’t for Wingate. If I could stand in front of the freshmen today and give them advice I would tell them to get involved and to not take what the university has to offer for granted.”

Emily is a sister of Alpha Xi Delta on campus, and she strongly advocates for the importance of getting involved in something on campus.

Academics are also a crucial part of the college experience, and managing a heavy workload can be one of the hardest parts of freshman year.

Junior, Alyssa Nelson says, “Don’t procrastinate, keep up with your work, take time for yourself, and be open to change.”

Forming a good work ethic and a good study schedule that is easy to stick to is a good thing for a freshman to do.

“Some of the most important advice I can give is to go to class, keep up with all of the work, ask questions and go to office hours,” says sophomore, Jacob Baker.

Keeping up with classes makes it very attainable to make good grades.

College is such an exciting time in all of our lives, and it is important to make the most of it while it lasts because it flies by too fast. So, focus on your schoolwork, but do not forget to get out there and make friends and life-long memories.

Edited by: Rachael Robinson

School of Sports Sciences professor to participate in service project in Nepal for two weeks

Brendan Shriver, News Writer

Dr. Brandy Clemmer, a School of Sports Sciences professor and the head of the school’s Leadership Academy, will be leaving the United States next week to participate in a service project in Nepal with the organization Wine to Water for two weeks.

This project is nothing new to Dr. Clemmer. As head of the Leadership Academy, she and a selected group of Sport Management majors have engaged in service projects at places like Victory Junction, School of Life in Gary, WV and many other local community service projects.

On a Saturday morning In April 2015, an earthquake devastated the country of Nepal. Wine to Water was able to respond quickly to this natural disaster by having a team on the ground within a few days to help provide clean water to tens of thousands of people. With all that has been accomplished, the work is far from over.

“In Nepal, I will have the rare opportunity to learn about redevelopment, experience water projects first-hand, such as digging wells, constructing rainwater harvesting systems, making bio-sand filters, and performing monitoring and evaluation procedures on some of these projects,” Dr. Clemmer says.

Dr. Clemmer was introduced to the organization when the book Wine to Water was a campus-wide read in 2013. By reading the book, she developed an immense interest in the organization and was also able to hear the author of the book and the founder of the organization, Doc Hendley, speak on campus.

Dr. Clemmer decided to volunteer with the organization in helping out with the Global Water Crisis. The organization gives volunteers the choice to serve in the Amazon region (Peru, Colombia or Brazil), the Dominican Republic or Nepal.

Dr. Clemmer said that her original proposal was to travel to the Amazon region but due to the lack of projects in the area, the organization had to cancel the trip. She then said that she was then given the option to provide the same service in Nepal. With that, she applied and received a Wings Grant from Wingate in the spring of 2018 to go on the trip.

“I am looking forward to immersing myself in a different culture and observe the different leadership styles present in a crisis situation,” Dr. Clemmer says.

Leadership Academy students will not join her on the trip. Dr. Clemmer leaves on the 26th and won’t return until Oct. 12.

Edited by Brendan Shriver    

Students Respond to Change in ‘Animal Crackers’ Packaging

Matthew Myers, Staff Writer

After 116 years, animals on the animal cracker box are roaming free. Nabisco changed the packing for their product after a successful lobbying attempt from People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA).

Nabisco claims the changes were made so that the packaging has a fresh look.

A question being asked by many is whether or not this marketing strategy will be effective. At Wingate University, 20 students were asked their opinion on this topic, and if it would persuade them to buy less or more animal crackers.

16 out of the 20 students did not care about the branding switch. But while most people didn’t care, the opinions of the ones that did were fiery.

According to Carly Heins, a junior, “I am so happy the animals are free! Who doesn’t love seeing animals freed from their cages? The changes made by Nabisco make me more inclined to buy animals crackers”.

On the flip side, Jake Dudzik, a sophomore, “I condemn the changes made by Nabisco. Nabisco changed a 116-year-old iconic label because an animal activist company begged them to. To see a mega-corporation fold to the request of an activist group is absolutely pathetic”.

Dudzik goes on explain “This change boils down to political correctness. That is something the majority of Americans are fed up with. I do not foresee this strategy garnering Nabisco any substantial revenue”.

At least on  Wingate’s campus, the repackaging does not seem like it will have a large effect on sales. Almost everyone stated that they would continue to buy animal crackers at the same rate they buy them now. While there is speculation about positive long-term effects, only time will tell if this change will pay off.   

Edited By, Rachael Robinson

Campus Dining Welcomes Changes for 2018

Aaliyah Parson, Staff Writer

W.T Harris Dining Hall welcomes new and returning students after making several new improvements over the summer. The caf has made renovations that not only improve the quality of service to students but the dining experience as well. Accommodations were also made during the renovations for the large influx of new students.

One of the many noticeable changes is the relocation of the pizza station. A new salad prep and fresh fruit station were also added as well as a new Yogurt and Dessert station and two new beverage stations.

David Penny, general manager of Aramark, stated his goal when making improvements was, “To overall improve dining. The goal is long reaching. I have a five-year plan of continuously improving.”

While making these improvements Penny’s biggest challenge was time, “Never enough time where students aren’t on campus. Everything has to be done in short time periods.”

Many students occupied campus over the summer during summer camp and training. While returning students have watched these changes unfold, what Penny has in store next is sure to be a surprise.

Penny exclaims, “The amount of improvements we have planned over the next five years will not be recognizable to anyone right now!”

Edited by Rachael Robinson

Pushing New Boundaries at Wingate University

Savanna Harris, Staff Writer

The start of your college journey can come across as daunting. In most cases, everything is new. New city, new people, the list goes on.

From moving into a space filled with unfamiliar faces to hoping that you don’t walk into the wrong room on your first day of classes, it can all seem rather intimidating.

No one knows this to be true more than the 933 new members of the freshman class of 2022 here at Wingate. With orientation long over and classes beginning more than two weeks ago now, they have gotten a firsthand look at college life.

Freshmen Kayden Wilson and Hailey McCarty were both eager to share their thoughts.

Overall, the general consensus seemed to be that, so far, college is great but definitely a far cry from high school.

According to Hailey, “It’s very… different from the life that I am used to. I’ve never had this amount of freedom before. There’s definitely been a learning curve as I’ve figured things out.”

On the other hand, Kayden went as far as to say, “Honestly, college, in my opinion, is amazing. Personally, I thought I would end up being homesick, but I took Ruth’s (one of the Orientation leaders) advice when she said to get involved and have loved every second on this campus!”

Getting involved in your new community can be one of the best ways to become more connected to it. Along with potentially opening up new opportunities, it allows for the chance to connect with people on an individual level.

“I am a part of the Common Ground worship ministry here on campus, as a singer,” Hailey said. “It’s been really cool meeting other people who are into the same things that I am through that program. I’m also thinking about joining the Psychology Club, but I haven’t fully decided yet.”

Another way to meet new people, although this one isn’t quite so voluntary, is living in a dorm for the first time. Hailey and Kayden are thankfully enjoying their new living situations.

Kayden said, “I love my roomies and my suitemates across the hall! We have an open door policy and it makes me feel a lot closer with them.” It remains true that living in that close of quarters with people can cause friendships to form extremely quickly.

All in all, let’s face it, being a freshman can be scary. But, despite occasional homesickness or a particularly stressful class or assignment, college is the adventure of a lifetime. It may not seem like it at times, but running through a downpour to make your 8 a.m. will be worth it in the end. There might even be time for the occasional Netflix binge, too.

Edited by Rachael Robinson